Daily Archives: March 24, 2017

How Mass Effect: Andromeda builds on the series’ legacy

In its closing moments, Andromeda made me feel the way I felt when I finished Mass Effect 1 for the first time. Mass Effect 1 was where you met Garrus, but Mass Effect 2 is where he picked up a cool scar and became your best friend. If Mass Effect 1 is defined by invention and Mass Effect 2 by reinvention, then Mass Effect 3's job was to consolidate everything that came before it into a coherent whole. It inherits Mass Effect 1's sense of scale but applies greater craft to the creation of a smal

By | 2017-03-24T18:05:08+00:00 March 24th, 2017|companies|0 Comments

This week’s highs and lows in PC gaming

You haven’t finished Nier: Automata, you’ve merely explored the bedrock of a game that becomes more bizarre and self-referential with each playthrough. After the first playthrough the game introduces new ways of fighting, and starts to offer new takes on the machines and bosses you’re smashing up. When I found out I could sell my health bar and minimap, I knew Nier was a game for me. "It's not a completely new game, it's however the game we had in our mind," says the devs. Image 1 of 4 Click or

By | 2017-03-24T15:38:30+00:00 March 24th, 2017|companies|0 Comments

PC Gamer UK podcast #38: Questions Special

After a traumatic deadline, Samuel and Phil climb into the podship and set off on a journey PC gaming. Unfortunately, neither of us had played anything of note this week, so instead we used your questions as an excuse to ramble about stuff. Listen, and find out why fantasy is better with giant mushrooms, and why Legion makes for bad second screen TV. Download: Episode 38: Last of the Summer Apocalypse You can also subscribe on iTunes or keep up with new releases using our RSS feed. This week: Sa

By | 2017-03-24T08:40:20+00:00 March 24th, 2017|companies|0 Comments

Road-trip sim Jalopy is a haunting piece of Eastern Bloc nostalgia

I grew up in ’90s Yugoslavia, an Eastern European country that no longer exists. Its tenacity and stubbornness is a testament to the sort of absurdity that Jalopy, a lo-fi Eastern Bloc road-trip sim, attempts to recapture. Thankfully, a gas station is nearby. I’d rather deal with a broken car than broken human beings. When I finally reach Yugoslavia, the game shows off the coastal area—something I’ve never seen before.

By | 2017-03-24T08:27:28+00:00 March 24th, 2017|companies|0 Comments
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